National History Museum
 
 

News

  • National Science Week activities at the Museum

    26 July 2010
    Family Science day
    Family Science day

    National Science Week (2 to 7 August) is an initiative of the Department of Science and Technology (DST). It is intended to contribute to the awareness of science and to expose the public, educators and learners to science-based careers.

    Activities presented by the National Museum to celebrate National Science Week include science-based presentations to several school groups and on Saturday 7 August, a Family Science Open Day will be held.

    The Family Science Open Day will start with a Science Café at 09h00, with discussions on “The role of science in economic development”. At 11h30 a film on global warming awareness “An Inconvenient Truth – a global warning” by Al Gore will be shown. The last session, starting at 14:00 will feature a National Geographic documentary on human evolution, entitled “Tiny Humans – Finding Hobbits in Flores”.

    All activities will take place at the National Museum, 36 Aliwal Street, and is free of charge, but booking is essential. To book, contact Tebogo Mohlakane-Mafereka at 051 447 9609 or 082 941 7387 or tebogo [dot] mohlakane [at] nasmus [dot] co [dot] za.

  • Special exhibitions at the National Museum

    23 June 2010

    There are currently three special exhibitions at the National Museum.

    National Symbols – information and examples of South Africa’s national symbols.

    Soccer – the development of the game with particular reference to the Free State. Photos and memorabilia of Free State teams are on display.

    “In conversation” – an exhibition produced by the Nelson Mandela Museum, looking back on the lives of Nelson Mandela and Albert Luthuli.

     

  • May Lectures on Biodiversity

    23 April 2010
    Biodiversity
    Biodiversity

    The following lectures in the series on biodiversity, as a celebration of the International Year of Biodiversity, will take place on Thusday 13 May in the Reservoir at Oliewenhuis Art Museum, commencing at 19:00.

    Prof. Jo van As, head of the Department of Zoology and Entomology at the University of the Free State, will talk on “equal rights for parasites”. This will be followed by a talk on the vast number of fly species in Africa, presented by Ashley Kirk-Spriggs, entomologist at the National Museum.

    Refreshments will be served after the lectures. Attendance is free, but please book at direk [at] nasmus [dot] co [dot] za or call Shirley at 051 447 9609.

    Click here to download the programme here.

     

  • April Lectures on Biodiversity

    18 March 2010

    The United Nations declared 2010 as the International Year of Biodiversity. It is a celebration of life on earth and of the value of biodiversity for our lives. The National Museum, in partnership with the University of the Free State, will present a series of monthly lectures during the year, to which the public is invited.

    On 15 April Dr James Brink, Head of Florisbad Quaternary Reseach at the National Museum, will talk about the origin of modern large mammals in open grasslands, followed by a lecture by Dr Lloyd Rossouw, Head of Archaeology at the National Museum, on the use of plant silica as indicators of past environmental conditions.

    The lectures will be presented in the Reservoir at Oliewenhuis Art Museum, commencing at 19:00. Refreshments will be served after the lectures. Attendance is free, but please book at direk [at] nasmus [dot] co [dot] za or call Shirley at 051 447 9609.

  • Lectures on Biodiversity

    8 March 2010
    Biodiversity Past and Present
    Biodiversity Past and Present

    2010 has been declared the International Year of Biodiversity by the United Nations. It is a celebration of life on earth and of the value of biodiversity for our lives. The National Museum, in partnership with the University of the Free State, will present a series of monthly lectures during the year, until October.

    Biodiversity, which includes all living organisms on Earth, can be used as a measure of the health of biological systems and is also important as a service provider for essential ecological processes, such as pollination. Ironically, while biodiversity is to a large extent the basis for human existence, humans are directly or indirectly the cause of its destruction, contributing to another mass extinction. We should all join forces to halt this sad state of affairs. There are various ways to do this while keeping in mind that biodiversity reflects diversity as well as abundance. Important factors to consider in conserving our biodiversity include accurate monitoring of plant and animal populations, determining the impact of events, the power of food web interactions, habitat boundaries, and the stability and resilience of life forms after a catastrophic event or disturbance.

    The first lecture in this series ‘More is better: The essence of biodiversity’, will be presented by Professor Schalk Louw of the Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of the Free State, on Thursday 11 March 19:00 in the Auditorium of the National Museum (36 Aliwal Street). Light refreshments will be served after the lecture and car guards will be present. Entrance is free, but since space is limited, please book in advance at direk [at] nasmus [dot] co [dot] za or phone Shirley at 051 447 9609.

  • National Museum to co-host International Conference on Rodent Biology and Management

    8 October 2009
    National Museum to co-host International Conference on Rodent Biology and Manage
    National Museum to co-host International Conference on Rodent Biology and Manage

    The National Museum will, through the involvement of its scientists in the Mammalogy Department, be co-hosting the Fourth International Conference on Rodent Biology and Management (ICRBM4). The Conference will be held at the C.R. Swart Auditorium on the main campus of the University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa, from 12 to 16 April 2010.

    This will be the first time that this Conference will be held in Africa. The ICRBM meetings are held every four years and bring together scientists that study the wide variety of rodent species, populations and communities, across the scientific disciplines: from ecology, behaviour, physiology and reproductive biology to genetics, taxonomy and systematics, from conservation to pest management. Human and livestock health and safety to rodent parasites and diseases are also included. The Conference provides the ideal forum to exchange ideas and opportunities for local and international collaboration.

    For more information, see www.icrbm.org.

    Dr Nico Avenant of the Mammalogy Department of the National Museum is the Chairperson of the organising Committee and Mr Jurie du Plessis, also from the Museum, is the Treasurer.